Orange Bakery, Inc.
Orange Bakery Story
Orange Bakery Story

THE ORANGE BAKERY STORY

Torahiko Hayashi, Founder Executive
Rheon Automatic Machinery Co., LTD

Orange Bakery, Inc.

 

The Experiment

Orange Bakery Story

Orange Bakery, or O.B., is established in Irvine, California. It was built in 1978 to confirm the capabilities of the MM Line (developed in 1974) which produces croissants in a labor free environment and also to research the market for these products.

Due to the success of the MM Line, filled sandwich croissants became a common item on the lunch menu throughout the States, competing with McDonald's hamburgers in popularity, Soon, the MM Line was supplying Farmer's Markets everywhere with an array of pastry goods that lined up the shelves in their bakery sections.

The first MM Line that was placed in Orange Bakery has been running for 30 years (the conveyor belt of the MM Line has now traveled a distance of 40,000 kilometers, equivalent to a trip around the world), all without a single major breakdown.

Confectionery and Art

When preparing high quahty food and confectionety with home made taste, an experienced craftsman handles the materials with a light pressure, equal to a hundredth that of conventional machines. For this reason, it was impossible to produce traditional, high quality foods mechanically.

This was when Rheon Automatic Machinery proposed a revolutionary invention: Rheon succeeded at mechanically applying a force less than 70 g/cm2, that is, a force equivalent to the pressure of the human finger, allowing machinery to produce products of hand made quality. In this way, applied Rheological engineering has brought to life modern-day food engineering.

What defines cuisine? It is the creation of a completely new and different taste from combining different tasting materials with differing chemical and physical characteristics. We therefore might compare cuisine with a beautiful work of art, a painting, formed by combining and ananging different colors and paints, each unique in itself. This is what Rheon's Encrusting Machine and MM Line do : they automatically combine the different components that make up a finished work of art, the cuisine.

In this example, croissants and an-pan are not the paints or the components, but are the paintings or the finished products. The beauty created by combining the colors resides in the created art of the finished product.

Using a touch as light as the touch of Marilyn Monroe's fingers must have been, the MM Line delicately forms and mixes a varieyy of unique materials, continuously producing the baking masterpiece, the croissant, in a labor free environment.

The MM of Orange Bakery

The MM Line at Orange Bakery has been running for more than 120,000 hours, yet, today, this machine still produces the same high quality as it did 30 years ago, In fact, the beautiful croissants produced continuously have only gotten better with time, I would like to credit this fascinating achievement to the development of Stress Free theory and' technology, (The Stress Free theory forms the basis of the technology for Rheon's 1700 international patents.)

By providing the American market with MM Line products, Orange Bakery has transformed the pastry section in supermarkets across the nation. Where Farmer's Markets once carried only bread, vegetables, butter, and eggs, the MM Line has brought beautiful and flaky Danish pastries and puff pastries.

The quality in the bakery section of the American supermarket is now comparable to the high-class bakeries you would find in Vienna.

I must not forget the many and vast improvements that Orange Bakery brought to the labor asrects of the production environment in the States and around the world. By introducing and demonstrating Rheon's latest technology, Orange Bakery also served to spread Rheon's production know-how throughout the industry everywhere. contributing to the modernization of the world's food production industry.

For this reason. when the world baking industry shifted from making products by hand to preparing them mechanically, people everywhere purchased Rheon machines with complete confidence, born from irrefutable evidence. When I saw this. I knew then that my decision to build Orange Bakery 30 years ago was the right one.

Croissants, an-pan, and Japanese confectionery are all works of art in the same way as paintings and sculptures. These are all part of what we call "traditional art," which have lived within popular culture and given life to culture and society, much as the bloodstream supplies life to humans. However, when I think that before, each pastry was created by hand, piece by piece, I become confused and wonder whether my invention was a merit or a sin.

On the other hand, when I think further about the times when food production machines did not exist to make Japanese confectioneries, an-pan, croissants, and puff pastries, I become convinced that tradition can not survive when kept only in the heart. Tradition needs to be lived to survive.